Episode 1: Recruitment and Retention
The "two J's" - Jessica and Janet - discuss the "two R's" - recruitment and retention! Material in this podcast is based on research journals as well as their own personal experiences.

References

Dillon, J. A. & Kriechbaum, C. B. (1978). How to Design and Teach a Successful String and Orchestra Program. Kjos West/Neil A Kjos, Jr. Publishers 

 

Edmin, C. (2016)  For White folks who teach in the hood - and the rest of y'all too: Reality pedagogy and urban education. Boston, Massachusetts : Beacon Press.

 

Feierabend, J. (2000). First steps in music for early elementary: The curriculum. Chicago: GIA Publications, Inc.

 

Hartley, L. A., & Porter, A. M. (2009). The influence of beginning instructional grade on string student enrollment, retention, and music performance. Journal of Research in Music Education, 56(4), 370–384. https://doi-org.library.lakeland.edu/10.1177/0022429408329134

 

Poliniak, S. (2012). Secrets of retention. Teaching Music, 19(4), 40–45.

Selby, C. (2017). Habits of a Successful Orchestra Director. (S. Rush, Ed.). Chicago: GIA Publications, Inc.


Toyne, S. (2021). Music. In Cuthbert A. & Standish A. (Eds.), What Should Schools Teach?: Disciplines, subjects and the pursuit of truth (pp. 103-121). London: UCL Press. doi:10.2307/j.ctv14t475s.13

 

Show Notes

  • We talk briefly about"informance" (as opposed to "performance"); if you're not familiar with this, Victoria Boler's blog post about informance is a helpful resource.

  • Christopher Selby's must-have book, Habits of a Successful Orchestra Director, can be found here.

  • We mention Responsive Classrooms, but in recent years this has been renamed as Developmental Designs K-12. More info can be found here. Even if your school district doesn't use the Origins SEL curriculum, The Advisory Book has many other engaging activities beyond "Rare Birds."

  • Christopher Edmin's book, For White Folks Who Teach in the 'Hood... can be found here.

  • Read about Feierabend's 30 year plan as it applies to infants and toddlers here


 

References

Benedict, C. (2010). Methods and approaches. In H. F. Abeles & L.A. Custodero, (Eds.), Critical issues in music education: Contemporary theory and practice. Oxford University Press, (pp. 194-214).
 

Burnsed, V., & Fiocca, P. (1990). Bringing general music techniques to the instrumental class. Music Educators Journal, 76(6), 45. https://doi-org.library.lakeland.edu/10.2307/3400967
 

Howard, P. M. (1996). Kodaly strategies for instrumental teachers. Music Educators Journal, 82(5), 27. https://doi-org.library.lakeland.edu/10.2307/3398929
 

Lane, A. M. (2006). A comparison of two methods for elementary music teachers. Canadian Music Educator/Musicien Educateur Au Canada, 48(1), 39-43.
 

Mills, J., & McPheson, G. E. (2016). Musical literacy: Reading traditional clef notation. In G. E. McPherson (Ed.), The child as musician: A handbook of musical development (2nd ed. pp. 81-101). New York: Oxford University Press.
 

Thibeault, M. D. (2018). Learning with sound recordings: A history of Suzuki’s mediated pedagogy. Journal of Research in Music Education, 66(1), 6-30. https://doi-org.library.lakeland.edu/10.1177/0022429418756879

Episode 2: Kodaly in the Orchestra Classsroom
Remember learning about general music education methods such as Orff, Gordon, and Dalcroze? What about Kodaly? In this episode, Janet unpacks the Kodaly approach, which is most commonly seen in choral and general music classrooms, and discusses ways to integrate it into your string orchestra classroom setting.

Show Notes

  • The Chrome extension Transpose is great for transposing online audio/video recordings into a key that works for your students' repertoire. This is helpful for adding to Kodaly-recommended listening libraries or play-along tracks in class.

  • I mention Chapter 9 in The Child as Musician - a Handbook of Musical Development when discussing the idea of musical "button pushers." Find the book here.

  • Sight Reading Factory is a great online teaching tool for your students, as it generates sight reading examples based on criteria of your choosing. But you can also use it yourself if you want to improve your own solfege/sight-singing skills!

  • Find the Conversational Solfege level 1 teacher guide here.

Episode 3: Technique Tips and Tricks for Group Instruction
Do you ever feel like you have to remind kids constantly about technique in the classroom, and then feel discouraged that you're correcting more than playing? Do you feel like basic things like bow holds and posture just aren't retained between class meetings? Jessica and Janet share your frustration and discuss some solutions in this episode. 

Show Notes

References

Barnes, G. V. (2008). Challenging the middle school orchestra. American String Teacher, 58(3), 38–41. https://doi.org/10.1177/000313130805800307

Barnes, G. V., Balmages, B., Gruselle, C. L., & Trowbridge, M. (2013). Measures of success for string orchestra: A comprehensive musicianship string method.  FJH Music Company Inc.

 

Fletcher, S., Rolland, P., Roswell, M. A., & Krolick, E. (1971). New tunes for strings. Boosey & Hawkes.

 

Goldie, S. B. (2019). Rehearsing the middle school orchestra. Meredith Music Publications.

 

Nelson, S. (1987). Beginners Please. Thames Television.

 

Wright, E. (2013). 10 ways to improve your school orchestra program. Strings, 27, 39-40. Retrieved from http://library.lakeland.edu:2048/login?url=https://www.proquest.com/magazines/10-ways-improve-your-school-orchestra-program/docview/1338445437/se-2?accountid=9127

 

Young, P. (2019). Playing the string game: Strategies for teaching cello and strings. Shar Music Company.

Episode 4: Games for Group Instruction

Janet and Jessica share their ideas for orchestra games that energize and enhance the classroom and rehearsal setting. Why "gamification?" It's engaging while also improving your students' skills!